From Bread Riots to #Girlbosses: The Liberal Bastardisation of International Working Women’s Day

The socialist roots of International Working Women’s Day have been consigned to the history books, supplanted by a liberal feminist celebration devoid of a class character. Gone are the days of mobilisation for women’s liberation; in their place are shallow displays of white feminism – the alienation of exploited, marginalised women and the upholding of the patriarchal capitalist system. This is a call to reclaim the origins of a celebration, a day recognising the power of working women from all backgrounds to change the world as they have done in the past and will do again.

Remember the Fenians

The best way to remember the Fenians – and every other republican – is to make their ambitions a reality. Fight against the apathy that is so prevalent; agitate for a better future. Educate people on what the cause of societies problems are and what can be done about them. Organise in your workplace, in your community, and in your college to make the Republican ideal a reality.

Burnout or Bust: Capitalism & Health (Part I)

The idea of performing meditation during a stressful or hectic shift is laughable but even more so is the initial suggestion of adopting aspects of eastern philosophy to enhance work life. Trying to sanitize and repackage the teachings and reflections of eastern philosophers which centre around harmony and balance are bizarre suggestions by themselves and completely ill-fitting within a corporate environment.

If Coronavirus Was to Wipe Us Out, We’d Probably Never See It Coming

Complex subjects, particularly those of a scientific or political nature, are most commonly sensationalised. So much so that we end up with a Media Who Cried Wolf situation. When every trending disease around winter time is looking to wipe out humanity, one that actually could, would be impossible to ever believe.

Supermac’s – The Myth of Capitalist Innovation

Part of their strategy is to donate some of their super profits to charity or to sporting organisations such as the GAA. They do this for local and political clout, to be seen as ‘benevolent capitalists’ and obscure the fundamental social relation of production: workers create all of the wealth and have to sell their labour power (time) to employers to get by, while Pat McDonagh lives opulently, holidays and expands his capital in every direction using the wealth he has stolen from his workers.